FRIDAY GRAPH – PORT PRODUCTIVITY

Here is a sobering graph, courtesy of Maersk New Zealand.

Click to enlarge.

  

It shows container productivity (gross moves per hour) in New Zealand ports for Maersk vessels compared with other ports mainly in the Asia Pacific region.

The statistics show productivity as low as 20 GMPH in some locations, including New Zealand, and much higher rates in others.

Port size, ship size, labour restrictions and other factors do not fully explain the differences.

Some New Zealand ports, especially Tauranga, are better than others, especially Auckland.

The picture is consistent with the findings in this 2010 report by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research for the Local Government Forum.

Port reform in the late 1980s and early 1990s greatly improved the performance of New Zealand ports.  We were ahead of many Australian ports for some years but the position has now reversed.

A renewed effort involving ports, shipping lines and the government is needed to make up for lost time.

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2 thoughts on “FRIDAY GRAPH – PORT PRODUCTIVITY

  1. With our Port services operating at levels equal with India and Indonesia it is yet another reminder our nation must wake up from it’s delusional state.

    That graph reflects a problem I have been raising for many years. That we are poor judges of who we really are. Sure we win some rugby games or yacht races but when we do we think the entire world is watching in admiration when in reality 99% wouldn’t know or even care.

    We are now the 3rd most indebted nation in the OECD. Our performance both economically and socially has been poor and our attitudes towards it I find disturbing.

    I salute my country for certain things . But overall we are suffering and refuse to face the foundation issues driving us down onto our knees

    I’m not sure if it’s too much pride or an unhealthy ego masking a sad reality.

    But I do know our country is failing and very few Kiwis are prepared to address it. Not the media, not the politicians, not the roadside work gangs,or rugby club mates. The Kiwi attitude is “all will be ok”.

    We don’t appear, we actually are, a nation of people waiting for the miracle bus to arrive without even knowing if the service is operational and nor do we care to ensure it will come. We just stand on the roadside expecting others will take care of it.

    At times I feel as if I am a passenger on the Titanic with everyone too busy dancing and having a good time to even look at the design and structural defects or come outside to see the iceberg ahead.

    A good friend professor Frank Brosnahan is writing a book about perception versus actuality. Very timely.

    When I have asked MP’s what mistakes their political parties have made they refuse to answer. In fact they refuse to answer any of the hard questions. Yet I remain convinced we can only move forward when we understand where we went wrong. Our politicians are like a sports team who never turn up for training and lose game after game and just don’t care.

    Our politician’s attitude ignores their fiduciary obligations and they act with an attitude mostly focused on gaining votes an climbing the political ladder. Yet a fiduciary is meant to be a professional who is intelligent, diligent, operating their job with a duty of care and selfless in the service to those entrusting them, their care. We confer that power to them when we vote.

    New Zealand now crippled in soul destroying red tape is not only harming business and new enterprise, but hospitals, schools and all social services. As a nation we are at the mercy of cunning lawyers and blissfully ignorant politicians. The most successful business growth I can point to in NZ in the last 25 years has been the legal industry who have latched onto virtually everything that moves through legislation passed by puppet politicians who fail to realise the harm. So now we suffer with a major problem of accessing common sense and justice because of the remorseless mercantilisation of legal practice and the law industry monopoly on regulatory control and fiduciary failing politicians.

    I have for many years tried to understand why politicians the management of government which after all is a trust structure owned by the people. I came to one answer which is the root of all our problem – crown immunity.

    Although politician’s job is fiduciary, they operate under old rules of immunity that mean; “The King can do no wrong in the service of the people” But Kings and leaders do fail. The immunity laws must go because with it in place we are attracting the wrong type of people to the task of managing our nation.

    I am working on an idea to save New Zealand and I am interested in hearing from anyone keen on helping : I am hoping Roger, you can help lead the charge.

    * Establishing a registered education charity- ‘The Centre for Modernising Democracy’

    * To produce legal reports showing how we can remove crown and judicial immunity and incorporate fiduciary law into political and judicial management

    * Draft a Bill to outline Fiduciary Law Legislation

    * Social science experts to report on all aspects of selling this campaign to the public

    * Hold public workshops with multi media presentations for the project ‘Modernising Democracy’

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